Press

August 8th, 2014

The Telegraph
Lambrusco On The Rise
“Supermarket Lambrusco [4-9% alc.] can be a simple, sugary concoction. The best is the Waitrose (below), but the real lambrusco revival lies – for now – with the independent merchants and in restaurants.”

Note: Lambrusco Bianco (4% alc.) is not genuine Lambrusco. It was  invented by US importers in the 70s. ‘Reggiano Rosso’ is a DOP, but not ‘Lambrusco’. Lambrusco has to be made from at least 85% Lambrusco grapes. Hence the word ‘Lambrusco’ doesn’t appear on either the front or the back label.

July 29th, 2014


The Independent

Lambrusco Is Back On The Menu
“While good-quality Lambrusco has remained consistently popular in Italy, rehabilitating the L word over here has been no easy task. Last summer, Flanagan pluckily put a Lambrusco on the menu after reading about its popularity in New York, only to discover, in September, that her only customer had been herself. This summer, sales are strong, and Flanagan credits a new wave of more adventurous drinkers.”

Note: There’s only ONE genuine Lambrusco: Lambrusco Frizzante Secco (min. 11% alc.). All others are either commercial (10% alc.) or industrial (4-9% alc.) Lambrusco versions. There are no 60 sub-clones. There are however about 15 indigenous Lambrusco varieties.

June 17th, 2014


Table Matters

Summer of Lambrusco?
“We all know, of course, that market success does not equal a good wine, and Riunite lambrusco was, and is, almost like cherry soda. You need the ice to suck it down, and even then I wouldn’t call it nice. If that’s what you like, have at it. But the real problem of Riunite is that it’s unfairly prejudiced American wine drinkers against all lambrusco. Which is what I’m trying to undo.”

Note: Cool story. The ‘good stuff’ (min. 11% alc.) is not only produced in the province of Modena (though all Modenese think so) but also in the provinces of Reggio Emilia, Parma and Mantova.

May 16th, 2014


Evening Standard

Sip On The Hot Fizz Of Summer, Lambrusco
“Zeren Wilson, wine consultant at Bibo, the Italian restaurant that opened in Putney last month, says he began to notice lambrusco on wine lists on a recent visit to New York. He now has four bottles on the menu, one of which is a rosé called The Quarticelli Ferrando, which he describes as “a wine to convert unbelievers”.”

Note: Lambrusco has never been sweet in the area of production; i.e. when one talks ‘Lambrusco’ in Bologna, Parma, Reggio Emilia, Modena, or Mantova, one always refers to ‘Lambrusco Frizzante Secco, red (scuro)or rose’ (chiaro) (never white), min. 11% alc.’.

April 7th, 2014


The Wine Spectator

The Heart Of Lambrusco
“Lambrusco is not the easiest wine to understand because the name refers not only to a wine style, but also to a family of ancient grape varieties (seven are commonly used today) and a dozen wine-production zones in Emilia-Romagna and lower Lombardy. The fine Lambrusco scene is a tumult of production methods, wines that vary in color from pink to violet, and even different closuresfrom bottle caps to those requiring a corkscrew.”

Note: This is WS’s first serious Lambrusco story ever, though the magazine reviewed a genuine Lambrusco (did they know that?) back in 1995. Better late than never.

April 4th, 2014


The Guardian

Let’s Give Lambrusco Another Chance
“The idea of devoting a column to lambrusco may strike you as proof that I’ve finally lost it, but bear with me. I don’t mean that lambrusco – the weedy, pissy kind drunk by students in the absence of anything better – but real lambrusco: deep crimson, frothy, and one of the great glories of Emilia-Romagna.”

Note: You can find Fiona Beckett’s perfect Lambrusco food matches at her terrific website: Matching Food & Wine

October 14th, 2013


Forget Burgundy

Lambrusco: What You’re Missing
“This region of Italy lies north of the “butter line” where it’s too cold to cultivate olives – so the cooking fat of choice is butter. This, my friends, is my kind of Italy.”

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The authoritative voice on genuine Lambrusco (minimum 11% alcohol) since 1994.

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